Read about news, events, and opportunities in the field of German-American Studies. 
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Contact SGAS with your announcements, and we will post them.

Call for Applications for “The Yiddish Object: A Mayrent Institute Graduate Seminar”
[Posted 2/3/2021]
The Mayrent Institute for Yiddish Culture at the University of Wisconsin–Madison invites graduate students to its inaugural spring research seminar. The theme for this year’s symposium is “The Yiddish Object.” The title—and the word “object,” in particular—intends to raise a series of salient questions about the shape, scope, and goals of contemporary Yiddish Studies. What is the object of Yiddish Studies? What does it mean to objectify Yiddish as a distinct area of inquiry? What is the place of the material object in Yiddish Studies? And what, if anything, does Yiddish object to? The purpose of this seminar will be to think about the way the multivalent term “object” can orient our thinking about the stakes of Yiddish Studies as an interdisciplinary field.

Students will explore these questions and ideas over the course of two days—Sunday, May 2 to Monday, May 3, 2021—via Zoom. Each day, students will meet for two sessions led by scholars of Yiddish Studies including Professors Jeffrey Shandler, Karolina Szymaniak, and Isaac Bleaman.  Sessions will be conducted in English and Yiddish. Students of Yiddish at all levels are welcome. To participate in the program, please send your CV, brief biography (max 150 words), and application statement (max 400 words) to Professor Sunny Yudkoff (yudkoff@wisc.edu) by March 5, 2021. Your application statement should indicate your interest in the subject. It should also include three questions that the idea of “the Yiddish object” raises for you in light of your own research concerns. Students at all levels of graduate work and in all disciplines are welcome. Spots may be limited depending on interest. Participants will be asked to prepare readings in advance.

This event is co-sponsored by the Max Kade Institute for German-American Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.
For further information contact Professor Sunny Judkoff.

 

GHI Fellowships at the Horner Library
[posted 2/1/21]
Together with the German Society of Pennsylvania, the German Historical Institute will sponsor two to four fellowships of up to four weeks for research at the Joseph Horner Memorial Library in Philadelphia between June 1 and October 31, 2021 (excluding August 16-30 and depending on the situation with the current pandemic). 
The fellowship will be awarded to PhD and M.A. students and advanced scholars without restrictions in research fields or geographical provenance. The “GHI Fellowship at the Horner Library” will provide a travel subsidy and an allowance of $1,000 to $3,500 depending on the length of the stay and the qualifications of the fellows. Opportunities to research at other special collections in Philadelphia may be available.
Questions about applying or for the fellowship program in general should be directed to Bryan Hart (hart@ghi-dc.org).

Linguistic Study on the Grammatical Aspects of German and English High-Contact Varieties.
[posted 10/31/2020]
Prof. Stephanie Hackert, an English linguist at the Ludwig-Maximilian University in Munich, Germany, works together with other colleagues on a study of the grammatical aspects in German and English high-contact varieties. The team has developed a questionnaire for the tense of the perfect which you can find HERE. If you speak a variety of German in North America or know someone who does, please fill out this survey or pass it along. Directions are included in the attachment.  
Please contact Dr. Hackert if you have questions. 

Stephanie Hackert , Department of English and American Studies 
University of Munich (LMU) 
Schellingstr. 3 80799 Munich, Germany 
+49 89 2180 6161 
st.hackert@lmu.de

German Historical Institute, Washington, DC: German Immigrant Letters Contest
[posted 10/23/2020]
German Heritage in Letters, a project of the German Historical Institute in Washington, DC, is continuing its search for collections of German immigrant correspondence from the years 1800 to 1920. This month, it is launching an immigrant letter submission contest sponsored by Wunderbar Together USA 2020. Anyone holding collections of these letters is invited to send an email to contest@germanletters.org sharing the number of letters in their collections, any relevant family/personal names, and any available information about the origin(s) and destination(s) of their letters. Contestants will receive a certain number of entries scaled to the size of the collection they are sharing, and one entry will be selected in each of the next three months (October, November, and December) to win a package of signed copies of three useful books for German genealogy research: The Family Tree Historical Atlas of Germany, by James M. Beidler, and The Magic of German Church Records and Tips and Tricks of Deciphering German Handwriting by Katherine Schober. To learn more, please visit https://germanletters.org/news/contest

2021 AICGS/DAAD Fellowship Opportunities
[posted 10/16/2020]
For decades, the American Institute for Contemporary German Studies and the German Academic Exchange Service have been hosting scholars through AICGS/DAAD fellowships, providing valuable insights into the transatlantic relationships and building a network across the world in key fields for the United States and for Germany.  In particular, junior fellowships have helped promote the careers of rising scholars in early stages of their careers. This year, because of the pandemic, the fellowships will be virtual, with three new fellows coming on board this week and staying until the end of the year.

Fall 2020 Events at the Max Kade German-American Center at IUPUI, Indianapolis.
Events include the MKC Book Club, a conference on Decentering German Cinema, and a conversation with Filmmaker Sheri Hagen. 

Fall 2020 Events at the Max Kade Institute for German-American Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison
This fall, the MKI is offering a new live Virtual Speaker Series. Scholars from around the country and Europe will give lectures on a variety of German-American topics.
Also, visit a display of MKI’s traveling exhibit “Neighbors Past and Present: The Wisconsin-German Experience.” For a list of venues click here, or check out the exhibit online

Funding Opportunities from the Botstiber Institute for Austrian-American Studies. 
The Botstiber Institute for Austrian-American Studies (BIAAS) seeks grant proposals for projects that promote an understanding of the historic relationship between the United States and Austria (including Habsburg Austria) in the fields of history, politics, economics, law, cultural studies, and public history.